Stone Polishing Master Class

Atsuo Okamoto

Saturday 16 & Sunday 17 August 2014 / 10.00am - 4.00pm / Grain Barn / £100.00

石は磨けば光る。人も磨けば光る。磨いた石は優しくなり磨かれた人も優しくなる。磨くためには長い時間が必要なのだ。

"A stone has two faces - one is rough and aggressive, the other is soft and gentle. We grind and polish a stone, then a stone has soft and gentle face." Atsuo Okamoto, 2014 

This is a very special opportunity to spend two days working under the supervision of acclaimed Japanese sculptor Atsuo Okamoto. The workshop is designed for those with experience of working with stone. Please bring your own stone / work for polishing. We will supply some stone for practice purposes. You will be working with hand tools. Tools, gloves and safety goggles are supplied. Bring a packed lunch, tea and coffee provided. 

We anticipate that places for this workshop will fill very quickly. Please email to check availability then complete and return a booking form with payment (full amount or £50 deposit / £50 balance payable by 1st August). Self-catering accommodation and overnight camping may be available - please ask for details. 

"Polishing stone brings the essence of the stone, from deep within, out to the surface. It defines the depth of its existence. Polishing creates a surface on the stone like water on a calm day, smooth and reflective." Atsuo Okamoto, 2014


Atsuo Okamoto, whilst being a consummate carver and fabricator in granite, is also a profoundly contemporary artist. His work not only celebrates the values and sensibilities of the stone carver but also transcends the conventions of sculpture in stone to engage with issues of contemporary life and art making. He uses sound and water as integral elements of his sculpture which is borne of his own history as a child in Hiroshima. The work reveals a wit, charm and sense of humour essential to his own being.

In 2011 the Sidney Nolan Tust organised Atsuo's first London exhibition at the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground at Chelsea College of Art, adjacent to Tate Britain. His work can be viewed at the University of Warwick's sculpture trail and Cass Sculpture Foundation.  

Supported By

Arts Council England